Our 2019 Featured #WomenInScience

Tolu Oni  (Nigeria)

“Sparked by her keen interest in study medicine at a younger age, Tolu Oni has researched the interaction between chronic infections and non-infectious diseases and the impact of the environment on the health of individuals. Her work has earned her many leadership positions such as election to the South Africa Young Academy of Science in 2013. She is establishing the Research Initiative for Cities Health and Equity (RICHE), a research programme for urban health research in Africa. (cc:facetofaceafrica)

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Rapelang Rabana (South Africa)

“Upon graduating in Business Science with Honors in Computer Science from the University of Cape Town, Rapelang Rabana co-founded Yeigo Communications, South Africa’s first development company that offered free VoIP mobile services. Through its success, it soon partnered with Telfree, a Swiss Telecommunications Company and Rapelang created a mobile learning app, ReKindle Learning. It is no wonder, then, that she has been listed in several awards such as Forbes’ 30 Under 30: Africa’s Best Young Entrepreneurs and Oprah Magazine’s O Power List 2012. (cc:Ayibamagazine)

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Nagwa Abdel Meguid  (Egypt)

“Dr. Nagwa is a notable geneticist who has identified several genetic mutations that cause common syndromes such as the fragile X syndrome and Autism. In 2002, she won the L’Oreal UNESCO Award for Women in Science for Africa and the Middle East. Since then, she has set up clinics for children with special needs, as well as dealing with early intervention. She is also a member of several groups such as the Gender Research in Africa into Information Communication Technologies for Empowerment (GRACE), as well as Autism-Open Access, to name a few.” (cc:Ayiba Magazine)

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Nashwa Eassa (Sudan)

“Dr. Nashwa has a Master of Science in Material Physics and Nanotechnology and is pursuing a Postdoctoral fellowship in nano-photonics. She founded Sudanese Women in Science and due to her research in nanoparticle physics, won the Elsevier Foundation Award for Early Career Women Scientists in the Developing World in 2015. She is also the assistant professor of physics at Al Neelain University, Khartoum and is currently collaborating on a project that aims at sanitizing water through solar radiation. (AyibaMagazine)

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 Quarraisha Abdool Karim (South Africa)

“Professor Karim is a South African epidemiologist who specializes in infectious diseases; is the vice president for the African Academy of Science, Southern Africa; and the foreign associate member of the Institute of Medicine (IoM) of the National Academies. Most notably, Prof. Karim was awarded the top U.S. breakthrough prize (Twas-Lenovo Prize) for developing world scientists and was also awarded South Africa’s highest honour, the Order of Mapungubwe, for her work in fighting the HIV epidemic in South Africa. Her scientific discoveries have contributed not only to better treatment but also to make women more self-reliant in risk prevention.” (cc:ONE)

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Francisca Nneka Okeke (Nigeria)

“Professor Okeke is a Nigerian Professor of Physics at the University of Nigeria and the first female to head the university’s faculty of physical sciences. Prof. Okeke is the recipient of the L’Oreal-UNESCO for Women in Science Award for her significant contributions to the understanding of climate change. She’s advocated for the further inclusion of women in the university’s department, which led to the employment of three new female faculty members. Prof. Okeke continues to encourage girls and women to participate in the development of science and technology.” (cc:ONE)

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Margaret Mungherera (Uganda)

“Dr. Mungherera was a Ugandan psychiatrist and served as president of the Uganda Medical Association. Quite significantly, she became the first female president of the World Medical Association — elected as such by 50 national medical associations worldwide. She had ambitions of entering the medical field from childhood and has spoken of the challenges faced in the field and the need to believe in yourself to achieve your dreams.” (cc:ONE)

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Sherien Elagroudy (Egypt)

“Dr. Elagroudy is an Egyptian professor of environmental engineering. She became interested in helping her country’s economy and environment during university, where she became involved with a group that was looking to start a campus-recycling program. They successfully implemented a program that allowed tonnes of recyclable materials from landfills to be reused. Dr. Elagroudy’s commitment to the environment has been recognized: She was awarded the Best Young Scientist award from an Egyptian university, received the L’Oréal-UNESCO Award for Women in Science, and was honoured as a young scientist at the World Economic Forum in China.” (cc:ONE)

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Ozak Esu (Nigeria)

“Dr. Esu was named one of the Top 50 Women Under 35 in Engineering in the UK by The Telegraph and was shortlisted in the top six finalists of the IET Young Woman of the Year Award last year. Showing that women can and do contribute to their societies, Dr. Esu became an engineer in order to fix Nigeria’s energy problem. Her passion for sustainable engineering development will see her cement her place as one of the truly inspirational female engineers shaping our world today.  (cc:ONE)

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Dr. Julie Makani (Tanzania)

“Dr. Makani is a Tanzanian researcher and one of the most prominent hematologists in Africa. Her work on anaemia and sickle cell disease has led to new understanding of the illnesses — and led to her being awarded the Archbishop Desmond Tutu Leadership Fellowship for promoting excellence in biomedical science in Africa and the Royal Society Pfizer Award.” (cc:ONE)

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Save A Soul Team: Promise, Jessica, Nwabuaku, Adaeze and Vivian (Nigeria)

“Nigerian teens popularly known as Save-A-Soul Team -- Promise Nnalue, Jessica Osita, Nwabuaku Ossai, Adaeze Onuigbo and Vivian Okoye learned how to build a mobile app from scratch by using open source software from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology.

The app, called FD-Detector, helps users identify fake medicines using a drug's barcode to verify its authenticity and expiration date. They spent months researching and building the app and hope it can be a solution to the widespread sale of counterfeit drugs in Nigeria.

In 2018, The International Mobile App competition 2018 was held in Silicon Valley California, where more than 19,000 girls between the ages 10-18 from 115 countries, with the guidance of over 5000 mentors, worked hard for the past 7 months, developing and innovating solutions to a unique problem in their own community through creation of a Mobile App.

The Save A Soul Team emerged winner of the 2018 Technovation Challenge. (cc: CNN)

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‘The Restorers: Stacy, Cynthia, Purity, Mascrine and Ivy (Kenya)

“The Restorers’ (Stacy Owino, Cynthia Otieno, Purity Achieng, Mascrine Atieno, and Ivy Akinyi) prove that age is nothing but a number. They invented an app, I-Cut, to end FGM in Kenya and call themselves “the Restorers,” as their mission is to restore hope to hopeless girls.  The most amazing part of their story? They were flown to Google’s HQ to showcase their invention, which will no doubt help many girls and women end this discriminatory practice and see girls go to school. They all want to pursue a career in STEM and we are definitely rooting for them.” (cc:ONE)

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Rabia Salihu Sa'id (Nigeria)

“Rabia is a Nigerian physicist, professor of atmospheric and space-weather physics, and a researcher at Bayero University Kano. She conducts research in atmospheric and space weather physicsparticle physics, and electronics. Sa'id is an advocate and mentor for young women in science with the Visiola Foundation and Peace Corps; she co-founded Nigeria's Association of Women Physicists. She is an advocate and mentor of Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) education and is a facilitator for the British Council's Active Citizens' Programme.

Sai'd has received fellowships from Institute of Applied Physics in Bern, Switzerland and the Ford Foundation and made a fellow of African Scientific Institute (ASI). In 2015, she received an Elsevier Foundation Award for Women Scientists in the Developing World.[4] She was also recognised in 2015 by the British Council for her community work, and by the BBC as part of their 100 Women series.” (cc:Wiki)

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